Close to nature

This was a new hide to me, not far from my home near to the tiny village of Santa Agnes de Malanyanes. I had heard about the hides of Pedro Rubio, last year he was running a very successful one for the European Kingfisher, it included an artificial water container which allowed Photographers to “catch” the bird while rocketing down to hunt the fishes!

Last year I missed that photography hide but when I heard about a possibility to shoot forest birds near to my place I didn´t doubt to contact my best known photography hide agency Photologistics.

I have to say that Pedro had managed to create a really beautiful, artistic and aesthetic ambient at the place.  He had designed a forest pool with plenty of moss, lichens and fungus, old tree logs and ancient-looking rocks and stones. The hide itself was well camouflaged with branches and had enough space for two photographers, standard one- way-only spy windows and a camping chair completed the requirements to spend several hours without complains.

My special target was the Squirrel which had it´s feeding place right on a pine tree on one side of the pool but as it always happens (I have a problem with Squirrels, I newer get them) it didn´t appear. I was not disappointed however as several bird species, among them several Eurasian Nuthatches made their way through the dense forest to the food which Pedro had cleverly hidden between the scenery. Last not least a Meadow Vole appeared but the pics I got were not good enough for Dreamstime Stock Photo so that I am not able to show any.

Male Common Chaffinch

Male Chaffinch

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Crested Tit on moss log

Crested Tit

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Eurasian Blue Tit on moss log

Blue Tit

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Female Blackcap n moss

Female Blackcap

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Great Tit bathing

Great Tit

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Great-spotted Woodpecker in European Forest

Great-spotted Woodpecker

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Female Blackcap bathing

Female Blackcap

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Great-spotted Woodpecker on tree with moss

Great-spotted Woodpecker

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Eurasian Nuthatch on log

Eurasian Nuthatch

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

European Crested Tit on pine tree

Crested Tit

© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Eurasian Nuthatch on log

Eurasian Nuthatch


© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

European Crested Tit on log

Crested Tit


© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

European Robin on log with moss

European Robin


© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Eurasian Nuthatch on log

Eurasian Nuthatch


© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Simply Moss?

Mosses are much more than those spongy, soft, green and humid grass-like plants we find mostly in shady, wet habitats. If we look at their reproductive strategy we will be confronted with interesting and strange characteristics which are totally different from those we know from the “normal” plants.

To begin with, Mosses don´t have flowers nor seeds and their leaves are only one-cell thick! 

As they don´t have flowers and seeds they use spores for their reproduction.

Moss sprouts gametophytes and sporophytes
© Photographer: Joan Egert | Agency: Dreamstime.com

Their conductive tissues are rather poorly developed, different from vascular plants (the more common  ones). Instead they absorb the water through the leaves. Mosses don´t use seeds for their reprocuction, after fertilisation they develop sporophytes with unbranched stalks topped with single capsules containing spores.

They neither have roots but Rhizoids which they don´t use to absorb water though. Their biology is too complex to be explained shortly but for those interested there is quite some more to learn at Wikipedia.

In the image above we can see both Sporophytes and  Gametophytes growing on a patch of moos.